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Our Solutions


We invest directly in our clients' infrastructure to become partners in generating clean electricity.

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Our Solutions


We invest directly in our clients' infrastructure to become partners in generating clean electricity.

Power Production Solutions Overview

Since our inception in 2008, we have helped industry leaders create new, cleaner, and more reliable generating capacity by optimizing their waste energy by-products. By moving quickly on niche opportunities, our ‘client-first’ philosophy allows us to bring power where it’s needed, when it is needed.

 

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Flare and Vented Gas to Power


Flare and Vented Gas to Power


Genalta Power provides a solution for oil and gas producers to reduce flaring and venting while simultaneously generating a new revenue stream.

Genalta Power has built power plants that consume otherwise flared and vented gas from oil and gas sites across Alberta. In fact, Genalta was the first company in Alberta to earn carbon offset credits by converting flare gas into electricity. For example, Genalta’s Cadotte Peace River project is expected to reduce emissions by approximately 240,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide over its lifetime. Now Genalta is seeking to deploy capital in flare and vented gas diversion projects beyond the borders of Alberta in its commitment to create a greener and cleaner environment.

 

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Stranded Gas to power


Stranded Gas to power


Remote oil and gas sites can be constrained by a lack of pipeline capacity or high processing and transportation costs. By converting this gas to electricity, producers can use Genalta's capital to still generate revenue.

Genalta Power has worked with several producers to tap into these underutilized energy sources to generate power and we continue to make capital investments to generate revenue streams for stranded wells. We work with our clients to design a customized solution based on the composition and volumes of gas available to provide a natural hedge against unrealized gas revenues.

 

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Behind the Fence power


Behind the Fence power


Site Generation, or behind the fence power, can be a key solution for facilities with large peak demands or remote locations. Genalta Power generates the opportunity for predictable power prices and a sustainable alternative energy source.

Genalta Power has optimized a low cost alternative to buying power from the grid. By tapping into regional gas lines or using our client's own natural gas, Genalta has the ability to build power generation to suit site needs. This helps reduce and/or eliminate exposure to both spot power prices and delivery charges.

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Waste Heat to Power


Waste Heat to Power


Our solution for converting process heat into electricity for distribution into the grid or use behind the fence.

Waste thermal energy is one of the largest sources of inexpensive, and clean energy available. Technological innovations in the last decade have made Waste Heat to Power (WHP) generation economically feasible, even for low to mid-range temperature sources

The following are some applications of waste heat to power generation opportunities in the Oil & Gas industry utilizing the Genalta Energy Management (GEM) ™ System:

Gas Turbine Exhaust Heat Recovery

Gas turbine driven compressors are used to ensure that the natural gas flowing through major pipelines remains pressurized. Since they are widely used and typically operate at only 25% to 40% efficiency, they represent a large source of industrial waste heat.

Traditionally, the exhaust heat was recovered through a heat recovery steam generator which produced steam and in turn drove an electrical generator.  These systems are maintenance intensive and require a licensed operator to oversee the process.

The Genalta Energy Management (GEM)™ System uses new organic working fluids for efficient power generation, eliminating the traditional issues with steam-based systems. As a result, Genalta Power's waste heats to power generation units are exceptionally well suited for gas turbine applications.

Amine Facility Heat Recovery

A typical amine gas treatment process includes an absorber unit, a regenerator unit, and accessory equipment. In the absorber, the amine solution is cooled so the down-flowing amine solution absorbs H2S and CO2 from the up-flowing sour gas to produce a sweetened gas streamas a product and an amine solution rich in the absorbed acid gases.

The resultant "rich" amine stream is then routed into the regenerator and heated to allow the contaminates to be released (a stripper and reboiler) and then re-cooled through cooling towers to produce regenerated or "lean" amine,  that is later recycled for reuse in the absorber. The GEM™ System allows for the harnessing of the heat prior to the cooling process and the generation of emission-free electricity.

Process Hot Water Heat Recovery

Water is often an unwanted and costly by-product of producing oil and gas.  During surface processing it is separated from the hydrocarbons and then re-injected into the reservoir.  In some areas, the water temperature and flow rates are adequate to generate electrical power before it is re-injected. 

The heat available from the process water is captured prior to re-injection and through a Genalta Energy Management (GEM) ™ System is converted into mechanical power, which drives an electric generator.  Due to the lower temperatures associated with water cut heat recovery, Genalta Power’s Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) based GEM™ system is well suited for heat to power generation in this application. 

Reciprocating Engines

Reciprocating engines are one of the largest consumers of fuel gas in industrial applications.  Since they typically only operate at 30% - 40% efficiency, reciprocating engines represent a very large source of waste heat.  At Genalta Power, we are focused on large reciprocating engines that have 2,500 horsepower or greater, as they produce the best potential for heat recovery.

The main waste heat sources that Genalta Power utilizes are the cylinder cooling, turbo cooling, surface heat loss and exhaust. The waste heat to power generation system does not interfere with the reciprocating engine's performance and backpressure is taken into account in the engineering phase of a project.  The heat recovery equipment is installed in parallel with the radiator to ensure reliability.

The additional power generated can be used onsite or sold to the electrical grid depending on the owners' specific power requirements and the proximity to power lines. The lower temperatures associated with reciprocating engine heat recovery makes the Genalta Energy Management (GEM) ™ System particularly well suited.

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Biomass


Biomass


A no capital solution for the Forestry industry to convert its byproduct into usable and marketable power.

With an energy source like wood waste, there is a range of technologies to be evaluated in the Genalta Energy Study (GES™). The correct technology for site will be the one that maximizes runtime. Other criteria for evaluation include capital cost per watt, operating costs, parasitic load, and sensitivity to fuel conditions.

 

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Waste Pressure


Waste Pressure


Pressure letdowns represent another source of waste energy on many industrial sites. Through innovative applications of proven technology, Genalta Power can generate electricity from gas or liquid pressure letdowns.

Pressure control valves are used to reIn any process where gas or liquid goes from a high pressure to a low pressure, this pressure drop is controlled using a pressure control valve. Genalta Power can bypass this pressure control valve to generate power using a hydraulic power recovery turbine or turbo-expander. In the case of a gas, additional pre-heat is required due to the cooling effect of the pressure drop. Sour gas plants are a very good example of liquid pressure drop, where the amine stream that is used to strip the H2S has a pressure drop across the absorber tower with a pressure control valve at the bottom.

Electricity can be generated by capturing liquid pressure and/or gas vapour flow energy. A practical example of this is where energy is extracted from falling water to run a turbine to generate electric power (e.g. hydro), but there are many other sources, such as:

  • Throttling valves used to drop the pressure of liquids (such as rich amine in natural gas processing or the manufacture of ammonia).
  • Throttling valves used to drop the pressure of gasses (such as ethane in the polyethylene production process).
  • Pressure from produced water when it is brought to the surface for processing and then re-injected into the well during oil production.
  • Flow or pressure control valves in municipal water and natural gas distribution systems.
  • Transmission to distribution natural gas pipelines where the pressure is reduced for natural gas distribution to cities, commercial clients or industrial facilities.
  • Pressure from the rejected concentrate stream of reverse osmosis systems used to desalinate water.
  • Cooling water inlets or outlets to large power plants.

By utilizing the waste pressure energy from liquid or gas streams, the Genalta Energy Management (GEM) ™ System converts waste energy into mechanical power to generate electricity that can either be used at the facility or sold to the electric power grid. This form of electrical power generation is typically referred to as environmentally friendly, distributed power generation; meaning the waste pressure to power projects produce electricity with zero net emissions, supporting the energy policies of governments for the development of electricity generation projects using clean or renewable resources.